thekimonogallery:


Oiran in Yoshiwara, Japan
September 02, 2013
Oiran were courtesans in Japan. Usually considered a high rank yujo (prostitute) in Yoshiwara, a famous yukaku (pleasure district) in Tokyo, especially in the 17th and 18th century. However, they are distinguished from the yujo in that they were clever (studied classical literature, shodo, sado, Japanese poem, shamisen, and Go), entertainers, and many became celebrities of their times outside the pleasure districts. Their art and fashions often set trends among the wealthy, and because of this, cultural aspects of oiran traditions continue to be preserved to this day.  Text and image via tokyopic.com website. Image seen at Kumi Ito on Pinterest

thekimonogallery:

Oiran in Yoshiwara, Japan

September 02, 2013

Oiran were courtesans in Japan. Usually considered a high rank yujo (prostitute) in Yoshiwara, a famous yukaku (pleasure district) in Tokyo, especially in the 17th and 18th century. However, they are distinguished from the yujo in that they were clever (studied classical literature, shodo, sado, Japanese poem, shamisen, and Go), entertainers, and many became celebrities of their times outside the pleasure districts. Their art and fashions often set trends among the wealthy, and because of this, cultural aspects of oiran traditions continue to be preserved to this day.  Text and image via tokyopic.com website. Image seen at Kumi Ito on Pinterest

moshimaiko:

Oiran matsuri by kost_jap on Flickr.
An actress portraying an Oiran in an Oiran procession reenactment. Oiran were high class courtesans, much like the Tayuu, except instead of being in Kyoto, Oiran were found in Tokyo. The way Oiran dealt with their business was much more elaborate and a much bigger procession to meet her clients than that of a Tayuu.  To my understanding, in the old days they used their natural hair, but today, the actresses wear heavy wigs, which is understandable. You can still see Oiran processions today as well as reenactments in small theaters.

moshimaiko:

Oiran matsuri by kost_jap on Flickr.

An actress portraying an Oiran in an Oiran procession reenactment. Oiran were high class courtesans, much like the Tayuu, except instead of being in Kyoto, Oiran were found in Tokyo. The way Oiran dealt with their business was much more elaborate and a much bigger procession to meet her clients than that of a Tayuu.  To my understanding, in the old days they used their natural hair, but today, the actresses wear heavy wigs, which is understandable. You can still see Oiran processions today as well as reenactments in small theaters.